UROP Proceedings 2020-21

School of Science Department of Chemistry 2 Department of Chemistry Construction and Application of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectrometer in Biomolecules Characterization Supervisor: HUANG Jinqing / CHEM Student: CHAU Cheuk Yui Sherman / BICH Course: UROP1000, Summer With its highly distinct, non-destructive characterization of chemical samples, Raman spectroscopy is utilized in a plethora of fields, including pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and geology. Its rapid identification of samples could therefore prove useful in differentiating between cancerous and non-cancerous breast tissue from the same patients. This report presents the application and viability of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in the characterization of biomolecules. The results provide evidence that the biochemical composition of tumor, papilloma, and fibroadenoma notably different but contain a similar spectra pattern. To analyse the spatial configuration of the tissue sample, Raman mapping is also utilized to visually identify the discrepancy between cancerous and noncancerous breast tissue and its influence on Raman scattering. Construction and Application of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectrometer in Biomolecules Characterization Supervisor: HUANG Jinqing / CHEM Student: SUN Weixuan / CHEM Course: UROP1100, Summer Cancer poses a serious threat to modern people health, so rapid detection of cancer is very important. This project focus on using multiple surface enhanced Raman spectrometers to scan different cancer tissue samples then obtain a series of Raman spectra. The purpose is to detect the special characteristic peaks of cancer tissues from the spectra. Analyzing soft wares, such as Origin Lab, are used to rebuild the curve from excel files and process data to build new curves. Then we use a mapping tool as the result has no distinctive features. A normal sample without cancer cells is used as a control group. Single Molecule Manipulation and Characterization of Biomolecules Supervisor: HUANG Jinqing / CHEM Student: SALIM Leon Ritchie / CHEM Course: UROP1000, Summer Scientists have used bulk techniques, such as Raman Spectroscopy and Infrared Spectroscopy, to analyse chemical compounds. However, there are limitations on only using these techniques. There is a need to analyse molecules thoroughly by itself, and this is where Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy comes in. It allows us to meticulously study not only the unfolding, but also the transition states of the biomolecules and the forces in the transitions. This report introduces the Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy and their examples. It also includes the background of optical tweezers and DNA properties. Finally, this report ends with short and long DNA optical tweezers results, the fittings using MATLAB and their analysis.

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NDk5Njg=